Manifiesto legal de la jurisdiccion exempta de la inquisicion
Manifiesto legal de la jurisdiccion exempta de la inquisicion
Spain, 1701
Balthazar de Mendoza y Sandoval, Bishop of Segovia (d. 1727)


Extracted from Library of Iberian Resources Online

The Spain of the 17th century was a world dominated by the superstition and the belief in supernatural forces that they determined the course of the events and influenced of decisive way in the daily life of the people. These superstitions and beliefs caused that those went many that went to the search of remedies or of formulas that allowed them to reach their desires or to swear in badly that could watch to them. The practice of certain rites, formulas and the search for multiple solutions to mundane problems became an important component of the daily life of those people. Beginning with King Carlos II, who claimed to be under a spell that prevented him from producing a successor to the throne, a confessor, Froilán Diaz, with the approval of the general inquisitor, Rocaberti and with the help of an Asturian exorcist performed an exorcism to release the spell that prevented him from producing an heir. The rituals put in practice would end up untying a religious and political controversy of such proportions that Carlos II ended up known in history with the designation: "the Enchanted one". Balthasar de Mendoza y Sandoval, Bishop of Segovia became involved in a deadly quarrel with his colleagues of the Suprema over the case of Fray Froilan Díaz which served as a sufficient excuse for his removal and Philip V, apparently in 1703, ordered him to return to his See. He is generally said to have resigned in 1705 but in the papal commission, March 24, 1705 his successor Vidal Marin, Clement XI states that he has seen fit to relieve Mendoza of the office because his presence was necessary at Segovia.

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